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Freephone 08088 00 00 14Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis
08088 01 03 02National rape and sexual assault helpline

Survivors abroad

Live Online Support is an online service that gives British survivors of sexual violence access to UK-based real time support from anywhere in the world.

If you have been raped, sexually assaulted, sexually abused, sexually exploited or trafficked, we can provide you with an experienced support worker who will talk with your through the issues that are common for survivors after a traumatic experience of violence or abuse. Support is available to women and men aged 13 and older.

The support we offer is free and confidential. .

We won’t try to persuade you to report to the police in the UK or overseas. This decision is yours to make. We will continue to support you whatever you choose to do. We will always respect your decisions.

If you are overseas temporarily, you can continue support when you return to the UK either online or in person if you live in our service area. Your support worker will be able to advise on how to do this.

It’s important to note that we cannot give you any kind of legal advice, information about the legal system outside the UK or any legal representation. The British Embassy, High Commission or British Consulate will be able to provide basic local information and provide you with a list of local lawyers. And we do not have any funds available to provide any kind of financial assistance.

 

How to access Live Online Support

1. Skype: Skype offers free calls worldwide between Skype accounts. Survivors can call us on the SkypeTM app by searching for Glasgow Clyde Rape Crisis during the above helpline opening times. Support via Skype can be by message, voice only call or video call. The survivor can decide which method of communication they feel most comfortable with. For a video call they can sign into their Skype account, search our Skype name then click the video icon and it will put them through to us. Skype requires an internet connection it’s worthwhile checking with the internet provider when using a mobile phone as roaming charges may apply when travelling abroad.

2. Facetime: Facetime works between AppleTM devices. It is free to use but requires internet access so users may pay for data usage depending on how they are connected and may incur roaming charges. If someone wants to contact us they can open the Facetime app on their apple device and enter our email address which is itunes@glasgowclyderapecrisis.org. They can then click on the video icon to video call.

3. Instant messenger: You can make initial contact with us through the Instant Messaging facility which is on our website at www.rapecrisiscentre-glasgow.co.uk.

4. Email: You can email us at support@rapecrisiscentre-glasgow.co.uk to make your first contact and start an email conversation.

These services can be accessed at the following times:

Every day: 11.00 - 14.00 UK time.

Monday – Thursday also: 17.30 – 19.30 UK time.

A support session with us generally lasts one hour. If, at any time you feel that you’d like to stop the session that’s OK.

Skype can be downloaded at www.skype.com/en/what-is-skype/ . Where possible, British consulates will make their facilities available to you to make contact. Try to contact us in a comfortable, safe, confidential space. You can use SkypeTM for a voice call, video call or instant message support.

You can also contact us on Facebook at @GlasgowRapeCrisis and Twitter at @RCCGlasgow.

Safety

As with all online communication, there can be some concerns about safety and confidentiality. Before committing to using an online platform for support, you may want to read up on security. Skype TM has information on its own website on how you can make your PC, laptop or tablet more secure and ensure that any communication from your machine is not retained in your history.

Perhaps a more important issue is that of the laws within the country you’re calling, videocalling or emailing from. There are some countries in the world where someone reporting a rape or sexual assault may themselves be in danger of prosecution for sexual crimes. You should always consult with the British Embassy, High Commission or British Consulate on this. Some countries can ask for SkypeTM communications to be handed over to them by Microsoft and the company will comply. However, in most countries this would not be relevant. The FCO will never share any information about you without your consent.

Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis is a member of COSCA (Counselling and Psychotherapy in Scotland) and fully comply with their COSCA Guideline on the Use of Technologies in Counselling/Psychotherapy, Supervision and the Use of Counselling Skills. You can read the full guideline here.

The benefits of Live Online Support

There is no one type of support that is better than another. It very much depends on the needs of the individual survivor and their own circumstances. For some survivors, not being able to see the face of the support worker makes them feel that they have complete anonymity whereas for others, that face to face contact, even if it is online, is important.

Some survivors tell us that getting support by email works for them because they find writing down their feelings is, in itself therapeutic and they feel better when they have put down their feelings on paper – or in our case, in an email. Everyone has their own preferences and you might try one or more methods before settling on one single form of support that suits you.

You can message, phone, email, SkypeTM, or Facetime one of our support workers and discuss what would be your own preferred way of talking to us. It’s important that you find a way that makes you feel comfortable and confident in sharing your experiences and feelings with your support worker.

Confidentiality

All communication between Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis and survivors who use our service is completely confidential.

However, we may have to share information if we have any concerns about the safety of a child or a vulnerable adult. We will always discuss this with you before sharing any information.

If we are concerned that you may harm yourself or cause harm to others, we may have to share that information also. We will always consider your safety during our support.

Our commitment to survivors

Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis is fully committed to providing respectful, accessible online support to survivors of sexual violence, abuse and exploitation. While we are supporting you we will:

· In return we ask that you will:

What we ask from you

We have a responsibility to ensure the safety of our staff and to maintain appropriate boundaries in support work. If any survivor’s behaviour online is unacceptable, we will tell them why and decide how we can work together to ensure that the survivor can get the support they need.

If the survivor’s behaviour continues to be unacceptable, we may suspend the support offered and discuss with them how we can improve the situation. We always consider discontinuing the support as our last option and will do what we can to avoid it.

We have a clear policy for all workers providing telephone, email or online support. If anyone is abusive to a worker, the following procedure applies:


What can i do if i’m not happy with the service?

If you are not happy with the support service you have had from Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis you can make a complaint directly to the organization. All the information you need to make a complaint is on our website. Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis is a member of COSCA (Counselling and Psychotherapy in Scotland) and follow their guidelines on providing support. We also follow their guidelines on providing live online support and a copy of this is also available on our website. If you are not happy with the way your complaint is treated by Glasgow & Clyde Rape Crisis, you can complain directly to COSCA.

Live chat

Click here to send us a message through our live chat system. It’s free and anonymous, and online now.

Make a donation

Click here to find out more about how you can support the centre’s work.

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